Spotted Turtle Dove or Streptopelia chinensis…

Spotted Turtle Dove Streptopelia chinensis two very gentle birds dropped in for a drink and a bath! This very loving couple visit our back garden almost every day. A few days ago they brought with them their young son or daughter and together they cuddled on the edge of a wall for half an hour after their bath and drink of course...

Spotted Turtle Dove or Streptopelia chinensis two very gentle birds dropped in for a drink and a bath! This very loving couple visit our back garden almost every day. A few days ago they brought with them their young son or daughter and together they cuddled on the edge of a wall for half an hour after their bath and drink of course…

A female peacock close up…

A-female-peacock-Close-up

A curious female peacock, she’s almost posing!
Over the past year we have really gotten to enjoy the company of these lovely creatures on our evening walk. A few have even begun to recognise us by walking with or not even atempting to walk away from us.
Sadly there seems to be a high mortality rate with their chicks about 30% so far seemed to have vanished. Likely cats, we have seen the odd few sculking out of view onthe Trevallyn side. Then before they even get to the chick stage possums are known to raid the nests for eggs, but we haven’t seen any evidence of scattered broken egg shells. I realize that these peafowl are not natives and some folk have questioned that, but it seems they are endangered in several of the countries from which they eminate. So in many ways keeping them in a public parks is no bad thing.  And thus far we haven’t seen any evidence of a depletion of skinks which the are known to eat. From observation I would say that the kookaburras are more efficient hunters where small reptiles are involved and even they could be an import!  Besides Jacqui Lambie needs peacock feathers for her hats!

One little wallaby…

One little wallaby and three japanese tourists

Its quite amazing to watch tourists looking at our wild life. They exhibit genuine delight and excitement at seeing a small wallaby chomping on a few leaves. Our padimelons peacocks and even possums are gingerly followed, photographed and giggled at. I started chatting to one Japanese gentleman a few weeks ago who told me he was driving around Tasmania for two weeks before returning to Osaka. Do you like Tasmania I asked? Oh yes this is the second time I have visited for holiday I like the climate, the scenery and the wild life. But tell me why do you drive so fast and kill so many of your animals. I was dumb struck for a moment and I admitted that I didn’t have a conclusive answer. However, after a few moments I did say that most of the creatures in the park seem to breed quite prolifically and that I assumed this was also the case in the country side, hence more animals and a greater number of deaths on the roads. I couldn’t offer an explanation about the Tas-maniacal driving but I did agree that drivers in Japan always seem to drive carefully in a way that Australian drivers never do.

An unknown duck…

Unknown duck...

There are a pair of these ducks swimming around the first basin a little bit larger than a wood duck with an arbitrary splash of white feathers around its neck. I have no idea what specie they are but they seem very content paddling around the basin all day…

The ultimate cute…

The ultimate cute a gorge wallaby

A very young Gorge wallaby crossed my path I froze he (or she)froze I clicked he departed… ‘Ultimate cute’  a Japanese tourist uttered. Don’t hug it I said the ticks will drive you crazy you’ll be scratching for the next six months!
It was quite funny I saw the mother of this joey flee before I saw the joey then it stopped dead in its tracks just enough time to take a snap…