A most Splendid Wren

Splendid wren

A most splendid wren,  It is such an absolute delight to watch these beutiful tiny birds zipping around catching insects just before dusk…

Australian Cormorant

Australian Cormorant
Water fowl Australian Cormorant

Saw this Australian Cormorant a few days ago its the closest I have ever managed to get to one. Captured at 70mm! Its quite a large bird and an ancient species not too far removed from the first birds that developed feathers after the dinosaurs It swims fast underwater for a few minutes at a time to catch fish then sits on rocks to dry out. Its a cold hard way to get a meal at this time of year. The light was fading fast when I photographed it and am a bit surprized how well two of the half dozen frames I managed to get of turned out. Image stabilisation is great but this one was pushing the limits a bit a constantly moving head of a black bird against dark water at dusk! ƒ3.2 1/60th at ISO 640

The first peacock chick of the year – 2016

the first peacock chick to appear this year 2016

This is the first peacock chick to appear this year and mum was very close by. This image was shot with a telephoto lens so as not to get too close. Wikipedia tells me that peachicks are born in clutches of between four and six eggs as an average but this year two hens have only one chick each…

Spotted Turtle Dove or Streptopelia chinensis…

Spotted Turtle Dove Streptopelia chinensis two very gentle birds dropped in for a drink and a bath! This very loving couple visit our back garden almost every day. A few days ago they brought with them their young son or daughter and together they cuddled on the edge of a wall for half an hour after their bath and drink of course...

Spotted Turtle Dove or Streptopelia chinensis two very gentle birds dropped in for a drink and a bath! This very loving couple visit our back garden almost every day. A few days ago they brought with them their young son or daughter and together they cuddled on the edge of a wall for half an hour after their bath and drink of course…

Tamar wetlands and black swans…

Tamar wetlands black swans

 

Wetland-swans

A walk through the Tamar wetlands in Riverside never disappoints. Today we were greeted at the first bridge by two of the most elegant creature on the planet gently gliding past. It seems that most of the birds at the wetlands have very little fear of humans. The only species that seems to be reluctant to get any where close to humans are the geese probably with good reason!

A Nesting Australian Black Swan at the Tamar wetlands

Australian-swan-sitting-on-nest

Cygnus atratus, the Australian Black Swan nesting at the Tamar Wetlands. This iconic Australian bird can weigh up to nine kilograms live up to forty years and lays up to nine eggs in one season which take between 35 and 40 days to hatch. This nest is over a metre in diameter and is sited about a metre above the high tide level. With the rain over the last few days I am concerned that one metre might not be enough!

A Great Egret and Swan at the Tamar Wetlands, Riverside

A great Egret and swan at the Tamar Wetlands Centre in Riverside

Amidst the winter storms the clouds broke up and it was time to get out for a walk around the Tamar wetlands. I have been hoping to sight a some of the Native Egrets and Herons for a while. After walking for an hour or so we were rewarded with this Great Egret and an Australian Swan that decided to move on as we arrived…